Florida Voter Information

Facts At A Glance

Registration Deadline: October 9th (by mail)

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Do First Time Voters Need ID?

yes

Do All Voters Need ID?

yes

Complete Florida Voter ID Laws

Do 1st time voters need ID? Yes
Do all voters need ID? Yes
Student ID accepted? Yes

 

What forms of ID are acceptable?

  • Florida drivers’ license
  • Florida ID
  • U.S. passport
  • A debit or credit card
  • Military ID
  • Retirement center ID
  • Neighborhood association ID
  • Public assistance ID
  • Student ID (if it contains a photo and signature)


*If your photo ID does not contain a signature, you will be asked to provide an additional identification that includes a signature.

If you do not have the proper identification, you will be provided with a provisional ballot. Your provisional ballot will count if the signature on the provisional ballot envelope matches the signature on your voter registration application.

Florida Student Voter Info

Students who lived in Florida prior to moving to another state for school, and who wish to establish or keep their Florida voting residency (i.e., at their parents’ address) should have no problem doing so unless they have already registered to vote in another state. If you move to your school address in Florida, with the present intent to make it your principal home and you do not plan to move back to the place you lived before, you should be able to establish residency in Florida. While the Florida Constitution requires that you be “a permanent resident of the state, “no court decision or other law suggests that you need to have anything more than a present intent to stay at your new address.

Florida Ex-Offender Voter Info

Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights restoration is dependent on the type of conviction: many can apply to the clemency board five years after completing their sentence, but others convicted of certain felonies—such as murder, assault, child abuse, drug trafficking, and arson—are subject to a seven year waiting period.